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Closing Remarks To A Cover Letter

How to close your cover letter

Monster career expert Vicki Salemi says to end your cover letter with a handshake, not a fist bump.

Goodbyes can be hard. Both in person and in writing. Do you get stiff and uncomfortably formal in your written closing statements, or do you like to keep them super light-hearted to the point where it’s almost comedic? Maybe you just avoid the closer altogether? But there has to be a right way to finish strong, especially when it comes to signing off a cover letter.

Luckily, there has been some recent analysis on the art of the written closing statement. In a new study, email software company Boomerang looked at sign-offs from more than 350,000 email threads to see which are most frequently used. There were eight popular closings, all ones you’ve probably used at some point in time: Thanks, regards, cheers, best regards, thanks in advance, thank you, best and kind regards.

Using these closers in emails is one thing, but the point of a cover letter is for you to stand out—and get a response back. That’s why Boomerang dived further into these emails to uncover which of these popular closings had the best response rate.

To our surprise, “thanks in advance” was deemed the most effective in the study. But from a job seeker’s point of view, at least, something about that phrase just doesn’t sit well with us.

That’s why we asked Monster career expert Vicki Salemi, who has read countless cover letters in her 15 years in corporate recruiting, to tell us what your sign-off says about you from a recruiter’s perspective.

Is “best” really best?

While the study determined “thanks in advance” was most effective when it came to receiving a response, Salemi is telling you—in advance—that it might not be best to close out your cover letter with that particular phrase.

“It sounds like a fist pump instead of firm handshake,” she says. “No one I ever considered as a candidate got looked over for being too formal and polite in their correspondence; however, the opposite—being too casual—always made me pause.”

When in doubt, Salemi says to go for the standard golden salutation: “Thank you.” She also likes “best,” “kind regards” and “best regards.” And although not mentioned in the study, Salemi says “sincerely” and “all the best” come across as formal and classy.

Say “adios” to these faux pas

When it comes to a cover letter, there is definitely a wrong way to write your sign off. Namely, if you go too casual, your cover letter is probably going into the trash.

“Even if you’re applying to a job at a startup with a laid back culture, avoid closings like ‘adios’ and ‘ciao,’” Salemi says. (Of course, ignore this rule if you’re applying to a job in which you’ll need to speak Spanish or Italian.)

Oh and maybe save the “cheers” for later when you’re out at the bar you’re your friends celebrating your new job.

“’Cheers’ is extremely casual and great for when you want to buddy up with someone,” Salemi says. “But as for a potential employer when you’re supposed to present your most pristine, polished self? Not effective.”

Just don’t leave without saying goodbye

Never thought this would be so complicated, did you? At this point, you are probably considering just ending your cover letter with your name, phone number and email address and calling it a day.

Well, turns out that’s not such a great idea either, Salemi says.

“It’s like working out without a cool down,” she says. “You need to come full circle and close it out.”

The main thing to remember about a closer, Salemi says, is that you shouldn’t overthink it. Something like, “Thank you,” “Thank you for your consideration” or “Looking forward to hearing from you soon” should be just fine.

 

XOXO, uhh, we mean: “Thank you for reading,”

Monster

 

Find more cover letter writing tips on Monster


What do I include in my closing?

Summary:

"Writing Your Cover Letter" is a series of short documents that walks you through the creation of a cover letter. Here you can see the information in the "Quick Tips for Cover Letters" and "Preparing to Write a Cover Letter" pages put to use. This page guides you through adapting your experiences to the content in your cover letter and its different sections.

Contributors:Angie Olson, Allen Brizee
Last Edited: 2010-04-25 08:58:47

A closing sums up your qualifications and reveals what you plan to do after your readers have receive your application packet (resume, cover letter, etc.)

Here are our recommended tips for closing your cover letter:

  • Close with a strong reminder of why you are a good match for the job position and the organization.
  • Request an interview in some way.
  • Provide contact information.
  • Thank them!
  • Sign your name and print it underneath.

For example:

I am eager to speak with you and discuss my possible contribution to Country Press, as I feel my experiences in communication and customer service will be an asset to the company. I will be in touch with you within a week, and if you need to reach me, you can call 423-512-1143, or email me at anyone@anywhere.com. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Stating that you will contact the potential employer will cause them to read your application materials with more interest. Therefore, you have a better chance that your materials will not be filed away. By following up, you can achieve three goals:

  • Inform the employers that you are still interested.
  • Prove you can take the initiative to call.
  • Discover where you are in the hiring process.

If you do not feel comfortable informing your readers when you will contact them, you may simply delete that part of the closing. For example:

I am eager to speak with you and discuss my possible contribution to Country Press, as I feel my experiences in communication and customer service will be an asset to the company. Please contact me at 423-512-1143, or email me at anyone@anywhere.com. Thank you for your time and consideration.

If you say you will call, though, do not forget to do so.

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