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Olechnowicz Scholarship Essays

This book investigates those fields in British history that have been illustrated by the works of Ross McKibbin, one of the foremost historians of twentieth-century Britain. The book examines McKibbin's life and thought, and explores the implications of his arguments. One of his most important achievements has been to break down the artificial barriers that existed between ‘social’ and ‘political’ history, in order to enrich the writing of both; that legacy is reflected throughout this book. From international football to Liberal internationalism, from the hedonism of the early Labour party to ... More

This book investigates those fields in British history that have been illustrated by the works of Ross McKibbin, one of the foremost historians of twentieth-century Britain. The book examines McKibbin's life and thought, and explores the implications of his arguments. One of his most important achievements has been to break down the artificial barriers that existed between ‘social’ and ‘political’ history, in order to enrich the writing of both; that legacy is reflected throughout this book. From international football to Liberal internationalism, from the hedonism of the early Labour party to the relationship between London cabbies and Thatcherism, this book attempts to explore contemporary Britain, endeavouring to be as original, sincere, rebarbative, and diverting as the historian whose work has inspired it.

Keywords: British history, Ross McKibbin, social history, political history, contemporary Britain, international football, internationalism, Labour party, London cabbies, Thatcherism

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2011Print ISBN-13: 9780199579884
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199579884.001.0001

Edited by Clare V. J. Griffiths, Senior Lecturer in Modern History, University of Sheffield, James J. Nott, Lecturer in Modern History, University of St. Andrews, and William Whyte, Fellow, Tutor, and University Lecturer in History, St John's College, Oxford

Clare V. J. Griffiths is the author of Labour and the Countryside: The Politics of Rural Britain 1918-1939 (2007).

James J. Nott is the author of Music for the People: Popular Music and Dance in Interwar Britain (2002). He is currently writing a book on the history of dancing and dance halls in Britain, 1920-1960.

William Whyte is the author of Oxford Jackson: Architecture, Education, Status and Style (2006) and co-editor of Redefining Christian Britain (2007). He is currently writing a book on the architecture of Britain's modern universities.

MARTIN CEADEL, fellow, tutor, and professor of politics at New College, Oxford
ROBERT COLLS, professor of English History at the University of Leicester
EVE COLPUS, a graduate student at New College, Oxford
JOHN DAVIS, fellow, praelector, and university lecturer in history at Queen's College, Oxford
EMMA EADIE, head of history at Loughborough High School
PETER GHOSH, fellow, tutor, and university lecturer in history at St Anne's College, Oxford
CLARE V. J. GRIFFITHS, senior lecturer in history at the University of Sheffield
BOYD HILTON, professor of history and fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge
JANET HOWARTH, fellow, tutor, and university lecturer in history at St Hilda's College, Oxford
BEN JACKSON, fellow, praelector, and university lecturer in history at University College, Oxford
PAUL JOHNSON, vice chancellor of La Trobe University
JOSEPH McALEER, independent scholar living in Connecticut
GREGG McCLYMONT, MP for Cumbernauld, Kilsyth, and Kirkintilloch East
PETER MANDLER, professor of history and fellow of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge
TONY MASON, emeritus professor of history at De Montfort University, Leicester
JAMES J. NOTT, lecturer in history at the University of St Andrews
ANDREZJ OLECHNOWICZ, lecturer in history at the University of Durham
ROSEMARY SWEET, professor of urban history at the University of Leicester
WILLIAM WHYTE, fellow, tutor, and university lecturer in history at St John's College, Oxford
MARY-KAY WILMERS, editor of The London Review of Books

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