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Legitimate Claim Definition Essay

Buchanan, Allen. 2003. Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations of International Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Flathman, Richard E. 1993. “Legitimacy.” In Robert E. Goodin and Philip Pettit eds. A Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy. Cambridge MA: Blackwell.

Gaventa, John. 1982. Power and Powerlessness: Acquiescence and Rebellion in an Appalachian Valley. Champaign: University of Illinois Press.

Hardin, Russell. 2007. “Compliance, Consent, and Legitimacy.” In Carles Boix and Susan Stokes eds. Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Hesli, Vicki L., William M. Reisinger, and Arthur H. Miller. 1997. “The Sources of Support for Separatism: Public Opinion in Three Soviet Republics.” Nations and Nationalism, 3(2):201-229.

Tyler, Tom. 1990. Why People Obey the Law. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Tyler, Tom R. 2001. “A Psychological Perspective on the Legitimacy of Institutions and Authorities.” In John T. Jost and Brenda Major eds. The Psychology of Legitimacy: Emerging Perspectives on Ideology, Justice, and Intergroup Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Weber, Max. 1978. Economy and Society. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Further Reading

Baer, Josette. 2000. “Who, Why and How? Assessing the Legitimacy of Secession.” Swiss Political Science Review, 6(3):45-69.

Clark, Ian. 2005. Legitimacy in International Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hechter, Michael. 1987. Principles of Group Solidarity. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Hurd, Ian. 2007. After Anarchy: Legitimacy and Power at the United Nations. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Independent International Commission on Kosovo. 2001. Kosovo Report. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Locke, John. 1690/1980. The Second Treatise of Government. Indianapolis: Hackett.

Tasioulas, John. 2010. “The Legitimacy of International Law.” In Samantha Besson and John Tasioulas eds. The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Zelditch, Morris Jr. 2001. “Theories of Legitimacy.” In John T. Jost and Brenda Major eds. The Psychology of Legitimacy: Emerging Perspectives on Ideology, Justice, and Intergroup Relations. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Claims about value generally lead to essays that evaluate. Anytime a writer places value on someone or something as "the best" or "superior", that writer is making a claim about value. While writers should always anticipate how to respond to the opposing viewpoint, it is particularly crucial to do so when dealing with a claim about value. For example, people who are blind have a unique culture of blindness, and many believe that living a visionless life is better than living a seeing-life. But to properly address this topic and claim, one must anticipate and respond to the opposing viewpoint, that seeing-life has significant benefits. Another example is that of Ultimate Fighting Championships (UFC). One could argue that UFC is a dehumanizing sport. The anticipated opposing viewpoint could be that UFC fighters undergo extensive training and skill-based martial arts, thus making it a viable athletic competition.

Click here to read a sample that illustrates the claim about value.

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